How Do You Change The Thermostat For A 2003 Hyundai Elantra

Posted in Cooling Perfomance | Asked on Apr 15, 2010

My car just started over heating lately and everybody keeps telling me it’s the thermostat. Well the dealership wants like $200 to replace a $10 part which is crazy.

There are 3 Answers for "How Do You Change The Thermostat For A 2003 Hyundai Elantra"

  1. bobweb says:

    http://www.hmaservice.com/authenticator/login?returnAddress=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.hmaservice.com%3A80%2Findex.jsp ^(http://www.carparts21.com/goto/http://www.hmaservice.com/authenticator/login?returnAddress=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.hmaservice.com%3A80%2Findex.jsp)

    Have an independent shop garage replace the thermostat before you damage your $4000 engine. Don’t be “penny wise and pound foolish”!

  2. kelly_f_1999 says:

    really easy most anyone can do it for under 50 bucks …first go to any parts store and just ask forwhat you need like buy coolant and new thermostat and new gasket you wil fin dit by following top radaitor hose back to motor remove hose and the housing hose was attact to most offen two bolts and lift might have to tap it or pry it lightly to brake the gasket loose will then scrape off old gasket and repalce how you pulled it out not hard right refill radiator crank car watch flow drop and rise add more coolant as it needs it check for leaks pretty much sam eway on every car made and never go to a dealer unless theres no other shop open they wil be the highest and really any shop would do here is a few videos of how its done really every easy job maybe a good hour work on most cars you can look under hood and see where top hose is and tell how easy it is if you can see bolts just remove and your got it

  3. misterwizard says:

    you remove the coolant hose fitting at the engine, and it’s behind there. book labor time is 0.7 hrs. the hard part is getting the air out of the cooling system- you may have to jack up the front of the car to bleed it all out. At a shop, they use a vacuum / pressure filler, which sucks all the air out, then refills it under pressure in about a minute. It may take you an hour to get it out. You’d just have to let it run. The advantage of having a shop do it, is you could probably use a coolant flush anyway. Thermostats are pretty reliable if the coolant is in good shape. You can always call around to other shops, and ask them what they’d charge. They should be able to give you a price over the phone for this, but i’d plan on spending at least $125-150. $200 isn’t outrageous. A lot cheaper than a new engine.