1964 Impala Wont Start I Need Help Find Out Whats Wrong

Posted in Ignition Systems
  • Ok so i have a 1964 Chevy Impala and it wont start. I changed the battery cables has a new battery, tested the alternator new spark plugs and wires new coil all the terminals are new put back properly. It wants to start but once i let go of the key it wont stay on so it shots on but the continuity just isn’t there could it be the distributor cap? Also its been sitting for a couple months that’s when everything was changed even the timing was done. Please help me

    There are 9 Answers for "1964 Impala Wont Start I Need Help Find Out Whats Wrong"

    1. D says:

      Does it have good gas in it? If it’s been sitting a long time that could be a problem. You need to check if you have spark, and if you are getting fuel.

    2. military supporter says:

      More likely to be the ignition switch.

    3. Yodini514 says:

      ok,check the motor,transmission,and the distributor cap.if theres nothing wrong with these,take it to an antique car mechanic.

    4. grandpa says:

      sounds like the timming was done wrong.or could be dist. cap

    5. Ajax4Hire says:

      Pull each spark plug wire back, crank and see if spark to engine when cranking.
      It will hurt if it shocks you so you might want to use pliers.

      If no spark, distributor, wires, etc.
      If spark, then check gas, not too much, not too little.
      If gas and spark then you should hear it “try” to crank or backfire.

      If backfire or problem idle then timing is off.
      Set timing manually, loosen bolt that holds distributor fixed and adjust.
      Also check the vacuum advance on the Distributor (this advances the timing the faster the rpm to keep the spark ahead of the faster piston movement).

      It is relatively simple, spark of gasoline at the right moment(timing) will move the piston.

    6. MasTec 1970 says:

      What about the points? if the car has been sitting for a while it they should be checked try to clean them up and regap them and make sure the fuel is fresh!

    7. JetMech says:

      Change your ignition switch. It might be worn out on such an old car, and have too much resistance. A worn out ignition switch caused my 1973 Impala to die in traffic and to generally run poor and to be hard starting or not start sometimes. Now to be accurate, sometimes the key slot is NOT the ignition switch. I’m not sure about the older cars where the key is inserted into the dash and not the steering column, but the switch might be located slightly farther away from where the key is inserted.

      I say, change the switch because on the 1973 Impala it was hard to get access to it, being on top of the base of the steering column. If you go to the trouble to get at the switch to test it, you may as well save yourself the frustration of doing it twice by having the new switch ready to install at that time. Test the old switch AFTER you install the new one. If it is in fact defective, AND the car runs properly after you change it, then you know you solved the problem.

      Also, sometimes when the old carburetor equipped cars sit for very long, the fuel in the carburetor accelerator pump can evaporate and then the diaphragms and gaskets can dry out and become defective. If you haven’t checked the carburetor for proper operation, check that too. Check for vacuum leaks at the carburetor. If those gaskets deteriorate, the carburetor can actually come loose.

      There are a lot fewer things to go wrong on the simpler older cars…..but some of them are real show stoppers. Good luck. You’ll find it.

    8. Michael S says:

      Is the vacuum break opening up the choke from the fully closed position. When the car starts, the vacuum break should open the choke between 1/16 and 1/8 inch. That’s the top butterfly on the carb.
      That usually sticks especially if it sits for awhile.

    9. Mikaela P says:

      Check the following;
      1. rotor
      2. distributor cap
      3. fuel pump
      4. fuel pump relay
      Hope this help!

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